Abstract

A problem for most studies of business planning is that they typically capture only general planning behaviors and broad measures of organizational performance, and so are unable to look closely at the specific effect planning may have in response to particular surprise events. This study looks more closely at the planning-performance relationship by examining pre-planned and improvised responses to specific unexpected events. I examine whether improvised behaviors allow new ventures to compensate for incomplete planning, and suggest that this has been an unexamined contingency that may contribute to the mixed findings for planning in young companies.

I hypothesize that (1) responses that show a high level of pre-planned behaviors will have a significant and positive impact on outcomes, (2) responses that show a high level of improvisation will have a significant and positive impact on outcomes, and (3) responses that are a mixture of pre-planned and improvised behaviors will have a significant and negative impact on outcomes.

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