Abstract

This paper investigates social and economic objectives in social entrepreneurship. It analyzes the use of microcredit to entrepreneurs in the poorest regions of Sub Saharan Africa where individuals lack capabilities to escape from poverty. It highlights under which conditions social and economic goals can be aligned to improve individuals’ capabilities. Our findings show that microfinance institutions are able to fulfil their social mission when they have a viable economic engine to cater to that mission. This depends on the existence of institutional settings that enable entrepreneurs receiving microcredit to build sustainable businesses.

THE G. DALE MEYER AWARD FOR THE MOST RELEVANT RESEARCH IN SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

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