Abstract

THE G. DALE MEYER AWARD FOR THE MOST RELEVANT RESEARCH IN SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Given the fleeting nature of opportunities and the resource-poor state of entrepreneurs, time is of the essence during the emergence phase. Because motivation is a key driver of individual action, we hypothesize that two motivational factors (tenacity, self-efficacy) will increase venture creation speed. Moreover, in response to arguments that motivation may affect social and commercial venture creation differently, we hypothesize that these effects are contingent upon entrepreneur type. Analyzing PSED II data, we find that tenacity and self-efficacy have opposing effects on venture creation speed and that the effect of self-efficacy is weaker for social entrepreneurs.

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