Abstract

This paper contributes to the emerging wave of critical entrepreneurship studies by building on recent conceptual advancements that view entrepreneuring as emancipation, i.e., entrepreneurial activities as generators of change and pursuit of liberation from perceived constraints. Using a representative dataset of Canadian Aboriginal SMEs, the paper investigates how the type of “freedom” / liberation entrepreneurs pursue affects the way they enact several aspects of their businesses and the performance outcomes achieved. Findings suggest that distinctly different business models, practices, and outcomes characterize entrepreneurs looking for freedom for themselves vs. the ones looking for change for the social collective of which they are apart.

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